Author: Julia Lauria-Blum

Julia Lauria-Blum earned a degree in the Visual Arts at SUNY New Paltz. An early interest in women aviation pioneers led her to research the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) of WW II. In 2001 she curated the permanent WASP exhibit at the American Airpower Museum (AAM) in Farmingdale, NY, and later curated 'Women Who Brought the War Home, Women War Correspondents, WWII’ at the AAM. Julia is the former curatorial assistant at the Cradle of Aviation Museum and is currently an editorial contributor for Metropolitan Airport News.

JFKIAT, the operator of Terminal 4 at John F. Kennedy International Airport, partnered with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and held a program at T4 to raise awareness of human trafficking, which took place on January 11th, National Human Traffic Awareness Day. An information table was placed in the retail hall where travelers and employees passing through the terminal could learn more about the crime of human trafficking. Before the program, the community and people from all over the country were invited to participate in raising awareness by wearing blue attire, which is the international color of human trafficking…

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eVTOL Evolution The Past, Present & Future of Air Mobility

From July to November of 1919, one of the most significant, yet lesser-known pioneers of aviation, US Army Air Corps Lt. Ernest Emery Harmon, successfully piloted the very first flight around the rim of the continental United States. The nation closely observed this trailblazing ‘Round-the-Rim’ flight, stirring front-page headlines across the country. The flight began at Bolling Field, Washington DC, and flew counterclockwise westward across the northern states, along the Pacific Coast, eastward along the Mexican border, and then across the South, returning to Bolling for a total distance of approximately 10,000 miles that were flown in 114 hours and…

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Bushell at the NTO Milestone Event

“New York is the front door to the nation, this is the gateway to the largest metro region in the country, which at its core is New York City.” Dr. Gerrard Bushell Gerrard Bushell holds a genuine, deep-rooted connection to New York, which is embedded in its metropolis. As president and CEO of the New Terminal One (NTO) at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK), Dr. Bushell is leading the team responsible for advancing a public/private partnership with the Port Authority, with a mission to deliver a special world-class experience in the building of an international terminal that will offer…

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Cornelia Fort

On the clear Sunday morning of December 7, 1941, flight instructor Cornelia Fort was flying with a student pilot named Suomala. They had risen from the runway at Honolulu’s John Rodgers Airport to practice take-offs and landings before Suomala was to solo. To the west lay Pearl Harbor and its crowded, still dormant naval base. Just 22 years old and a pilot of less than two years, Cornelia was one of the United States’ most experienced aviators, earning her commercial and instructor’s licenses within a year. Leaving behind her family’s Nashville estate, she had been working for two months since…

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AHS Students at Joby announcement

While most high school aviation programs require students to go to a nearby airport to work on aircraft in a hangar, such is not the case at Aviation High School in Long Island City. When you walk into Aviation High School’s 10,000 square foot hangar, the voluminous space is abuzz with activity as students clad in white mechanic’s coveralls work at stations, on aircraft engines, simulators, propellers, and atop ladders on a variety of aircraft that are housed there. The enthusiasm that permeates the air is palpable, and it is evident why the school’s motto, Aviation High School – Where…

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Accessible Services at New York Airports

This October, the Air Carrier Access Act of 1986 (ACAA) celebrated its 36th anniversary. The ACAA (Public Law 99–435) prohibits discrimination against persons with disabilities in commercial air transportation. Airlines are required to provide passengers with disabilities with many types of assistance, including wheelchair or other guided assistance to board, deplane, or connect to another flight, and seating accommodation assistance that meets passenger’s disability-related needs, as well as assistance with the loading and stowing of assistive devices. After a lengthy rulemaking process that included regulatory negotiations involving representatives of the disability community and the airline industry, the U.S. Department of…

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A Sneak Peek at the Newly Restored Navy F-14D Tomcat

On Wednesday, October 26, the Museum hosted a brief outdoor viewing to unveil the work done to restore the F-14D Tomcat currently stored in the museum’s restoration hangar. Before its move to the Museum in June 2022, the jet- Felix 101, F-14D BuNo 164603 has been parked outside the former Grumman Corporation offices in Bethpage, NY, since 2008 when Grumman’s successor, Northrop Grumman Corp., and the Grumman Retiree Club, created a monument. Said Cradle of Aviation Museum President Andy Parton, “It makes perfect sense for the plane to be at the Cradle. … We are the keeper of the legacy…

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Making Strides Against Breast Cancer

Last Sunday, I took part in the Making Strides for Breast Cancer walk at Jones Beach. As I strolled the boardwalk that morning alongside my husband and a friend, and the 65,000 others who attended this annual event, we walked the 5-mile loop from Field 4 to the West End of the Beach and back. The day couldn’t have been brighter, with a crystal-clear sky, temps in the low 60s, and a breeze blowing from the north at barely 3 mph. In the distance, I saw a circular pattern of jetliners arriving and departing JFK International Airport. It might have…

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Seaplanes & Skyports New York Metropolitan Seaplane Bases

Seaplanes are powered fixed-wing aircraft capable of taking off and landing on water. These aircraft are generally divided into two categories: floatplanes, which have one or more narrow floats (or pontoons) mounted under the fuselage to provide buoyancy without the fuselage contacting the water; and flying boats, which land using their fuselage (or hull) as its main source of buoyancy. Amphibious aircraft are in a sub-class of seaplanes that have retractable wheel gear that allows operation on both land and from the water via a ramp. Air service in a seaplane is unique in that it provides passengers the speed…

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Bayport Aerodrome: 23N

The 1,401 square mile expanse of Long Island, stretching 118 miles from New York City to Montauk Point is the largest island in the continental U.S.A. Today this densely populated land-mass located in the southeastern corner of New York State is home to some 7.6 million people. But at the dawn of the aviation age, with its proximity to Manhattan and its native grasslands and flat, wide-open landscape, Long Island was a natural airfield, providing the best platform for daring aviators from the world over, to begin or conclude their experimental flights. In 1909, one such aviator, Glenn Curtiss, arrived…

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